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All Animations OpenStreetMap

Made With OpenStreetMap

Inspired by the “made with QGIS” logos by Klas Karlsson.

I made a few for OpenStreeMap ones. Well, I added some text to existing logos:

The simple OSM logo by ScubbX.

The main OSM logo by Ken Vermette.

Both logos are trademarked by the OSMF, but these are unofficial. For the full attribution and copyright guidelines visit the OpenStreetMap website.

Color:

License: CC BY-SA 3.0 Ken Vermette

PNG:

SVG:

Black:

License: CC BY-SA 2.0 ScubbX

PNG, clear background:

PNG, white background:

SVG:

White:

License: CC BY-SA 2.0 ScubbX

Example:

All buildings added to OSM in Ireland in 2021

Categories
30 Day Map Challenge All Featured Ireland Maps OpenStreetMap OSGEO QGIS Scotland

30 Day Map Challenge 2021

This November I once again took part in the 30 Day Map Challenge started by Topi Tjukanov.

Categories

I had done it the first year (30 Day Map Challenge 2019), and had made a few maps for 2020 as well.

This year I wasn’t really sure I would take part, as I had no plans and nothing prepared. But it is a great challenge. It challenges your creativity, problem solving, and map making skills. It also sets a time limit so you don’t have to worry about being perfect. And making maps is good fun.

There were a few datasets that I had come across that I thought would be good subjects, and I got a lot of mileage out of them.

Dublin neighbourhoods

These included the Dublin Inquirer neighbourhood survey.

Will You Draw Your Dublin Neighbourhood for Us?

neighbourhoods.dublininquirer.com

I think this is a great initiative, and hopefully they get a real large set of responses. They are at over 2000 already so a great start.

I did something similar for Glasgow (here) but only got 367 responses in total. So the power of having a well read paper behind the initiative is great. They are also reaching out to areas that have not had many responses, which is really great work.

OpenStreetMap

I also wanted to do some maps around OpenStreetMap in Ireland. The community here has had a large push to map all of the buildings in Ireland, which has progressed well.

But it is very much a work in progress.

OSM Ireland Buildings poster from State Of The Map 2021

Selected Maps

Hexagons:

Hex

First of the Dublin boundaries series.

Final interactive version: Here

OpenStreetMap:

OpenStreetMap

For OSM day I wanted to try and make the data a bit easier to use for #QGIS novices.

I created styles that can be applied to the GEOFABRIK Shapefile extracts, from here.

The styles are available: https://github.com/HeikkiVesanto/QGIS_OSM_Styles

Red:

Red

Mac vs Mc.

Supermac’s is an Irish fast food restaurant chain, who have had a few trademark disputes over the years with McDonald’s over the use of Mc and Mac in burger names.

3D:

3D

This turned out a lot better than I expected.

Was pure QGIS. Create grid (5km x 5km), zonal statistics on CORINE (Majority) and DEM (Median). New field for height rounded up to the nearest 40:

to_int(ceil((“_h_median” / 40))) * 40

Set colors. Create centroids with same colors. These become the Lego nubs.

Rendered in QGIS2threejs plugin. The grid is extruded, with a height of height * 50. The centroids are cylinder rendered height * 50 + 30 * 50, so they come a bit higher, radius of 1800.

The “rayshader” export makes it look realistic.

Interactive: https://maps.gisforthought.com/LegoIreland/

Might be better to not use landuse, but elevation for the colours.

No Computer:

No Computer

Nice to get away from the computer. Definitely promotes some creativity. But I just took it as an opportunity to walk on the beach.

Land:

Land

My favourite of my maps.

Land use vineyard across Europe from CORINE 2020, with the major regions labelled.

GHSL:

GHSL

Seasonal population of the Balearic Islands.

Data clipping in QGIS/GDAL, rendered in Aerialod, with labels with GIMP afterwards.

This was my second favourite of my maps. I think the topic is interesting and the execution is pretty good. Was however quite manual and probably needed more exaggeration to see the differences.

Historical:

Historical

A time lapse of 1,831,044 buildings in Ireland being added to OpenStreetMap.

If you want to get involved see: OpenStreetMap Ireland Buildings

Globe:

Globe

Simple spinning globe in QGIS, but I was happy that I was able to automate the export: Gist

All maps:

See here

Categories
All Animations Ireland Maps OpenStreetMap OSGEO

OpenStreetMap Ireland 2018 Visualized

2018 was a very productive year for OpenStreetMap in Ireland.

Around 70k nodes added, 60k ways added, and 160k polygons added.

Finally a company was formed to facilitate becoming a fully fledged local chapter.

What does that look like day to day:

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All OpenStreetMap OSGEO QGIS

QGIS OpenStreetMap Scales

Save as a text file ending in .xml like qgis_scales.xml

These are the scales OpenStreetMap tiles are rendered in for 96 dpi, so the map will look sharp on most monitors. These are the scales for the zoom levels.

The xml file can then be loaded into the project from:

Project> Project Properties…> General> Project scales

<qgsScales version="1.0">
    <scale value="1:554678932"/>
    <scale value="1:277339466"/>
    <scale value="1:138669733"/>
    <scale value="1:69334866"/>
    <scale value="1:34667433"/>
    <scale value="1:17333716"/>
    <scale value="1:8666858"/>
    <scale value="1:4333429"/>
    <scale value="1:2166714"/>
    <scale value="1:1083357"/>
    <scale value="1:541678"/>
    <scale value="1:270839"/>
    <scale value="1:135419"/>
    <scale value="1:67709"/>
    <scale value="1:33854"/>
    <scale value="1:16927"/>
    <scale value="1:8463"/>
    <scale value="1:4231"/>
    <scale value="1:2115"/>
</qgsScales>

Example:

1,000,000 (QGIS default):

1,083,357 (OSM wiki):

1,155,584 (From: 3liz):

Scales from:
OSM wiki

Zoom scales.

Categories
All Ireland OpenStreetMap OSGEO PostGIS QGIS Tutorials

Creating OpenStreetMap History Visualisations

I created a couple of OSM visualisations for my talk at the OSGeo Ireland conference.

See: History of OpenStreetMap in Ireland

These are pretty easy to make, but take a fair bit of time. I did mine for Ireland, but should work with any part of the world.

Required software:

  • PostgreSQL with PostGIS
  • Python
  • QGIS
  • osmium-tools

This is the trickiest part, installing osmium-tools: here.

Data:

An OSM full history export. The best source for these is GEOFABRIK.

For Ireland:

http://download.geofabrik.de/europe/ireland-and-northern-ireland.html

Due to GDPR, you will have to log in with an OSM id to download the full history extracts. User ID’s are personal data.

Process:

The workflow is pretty simple. Osmium-tools provides pretty easy API access to the history files, where you can provide a data, and it will extract what OSM was like at that date. We simply need to loop through the desired dates we want to extract, and pipe the results into a workflow that loads the data into PostgreSQL. The final step is simply rendering in QGIS using the time manager plugin.

Python Script:

Github GIST:

https://gist.github.com/HeikkiVesanto/f01ea54cca499a6a144d18cf8909c940

The tables in the database will be:

  • lines
  • multilinestrings
  • multipolygons
  • other_relations
  • points

Each feature will be tagged with the date it is associated with.

Visualisation:

To visualise the data in QGIS we use simply use the excellent time manager plugin, filtering on the load_date field and with a monthly interval.

Result:

Categories
All Animations Ireland Maps OpenStreetMap

History of OpenStreetMap in Ireland

Last week I was invited to give a workshop at the Second Irish OSGeo Conference in Portlaoise. The event was a great success with a attendees from across the OSGeo space, from academics to startups.

I also volunteered to give a talk on OpenStreetMap (OSM) in Ireland. Since we are currently in the process of setting up an official chapter of OSM in Ireland. Check out OpenStreetmaMap.ie if you want to help.

Check out my full talk: here

But some of the visuals are more interesting than the talk as a whole.

To start out, the first edits in Ireland.

The first line:

Located in Banbridge, in Northern Ireland between Newry and Belfast:

First polygon:

Clearly St. Stephens Green, a great park in Dublin:

Then a look at the full history of roads in Ireland on OpenStreetMap:

 

A large part of the history of OpenStreetMap in Ireland is the townlands project. Townlands in Ireland are small divisions of land, often used in addressing for example. Your address could be: Mr. O’Brien, Blue house, Tawny (the townland), Donegal. The postman knows where you are.

There are over 61,000 townlands in Ireland. Traced manually from 650+ out of copyright OSi maps from Trinity College. Check out Townlands.ie for more info.

The project ran from 2012 to 2017 and the progress is clear when charting the history of boundaries in OpenStreetMap in Ireland:

 

And since the conference was held in Portlaoise, here is how it looks over time in OSM:

 

For the script to generate these histories see: Creating OpenStreetMap History Visualisations