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30 Day Map Challenge All Featured Ireland Maps OpenStreetMap OSGEO QGIS Scotland

30 Day Map Challenge 2021

This November I once again took part in the 30 Day Map Challenge started by Topi Tjukanov.

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I had done it the first year (30 Day Map Challenge 2019), and had made a few maps for 2020 as well.

This year I wasn’t really sure I would take part, as I had no plans and nothing prepared. But it is a great challenge. It challenges your creativity, problem solving, and map making skills. It also sets a time limit so you don’t have to worry about being perfect. And making maps is good fun.

There were a few datasets that I had come across that I thought would be good subjects, and I got a lot of mileage out of them.

Dublin neighbourhoods

These included the Dublin Inquirer neighbourhood survey.

Will You Draw Your Dublin Neighbourhood for Us?

neighbourhoods.dublininquirer.com

I think this is a great initiative, and hopefully they get a real large set of responses. They are at over 2000 already so a great start.

I did something similar for Glasgow (here) but only got 367 responses in total. So the power of having a well read paper behind the initiative is great. They are also reaching out to areas that have not had many responses, which is really great work.

OpenStreetMap

I also wanted to do some maps around OpenStreetMap in Ireland. The community here has had a large push to map all of the buildings in Ireland, which has progressed well.

But it is very much a work in progress.

OSM Ireland Buildings poster from State Of The Map 2021

Selected Maps

Hexagons:

Hex

First of the Dublin boundaries series.

Final interactive version: Here

OpenStreetMap:

OpenStreetMap

For OSM day I wanted to try and make the data a bit easier to use for #QGIS novices.

I created styles that can be applied to the GEOFABRIK Shapefile extracts, from here.

The styles are available: https://github.com/HeikkiVesanto/QGIS_OSM_Styles

Red:

Red

Mac vs Mc.

Supermac’s is an Irish fast food restaurant chain, who have had a few trademark disputes over the years with McDonald’s over the use of Mc and Mac in burger names.

3D:

3D

This turned out a lot better than I expected.

Was pure QGIS. Create grid (5km x 5km), zonal statistics on CORINE (Majority) and DEM (Median). New field for height rounded up to the nearest 40:

to_int(ceil((“_h_median” / 40))) * 40

Set colors. Create centroids with same colors. These become the Lego nubs.

Rendered in QGIS2threejs plugin. The grid is extruded, with a height of height * 50. The centroids are cylinder rendered height * 50 + 30 * 50, so they come a bit higher, radius of 1800.

The “rayshader” export makes it look realistic.

Interactive: https://maps.gisforthought.com/LegoIreland/

Might be better to not use landuse, but elevation for the colours.

No Computer:

No Computer

Nice to get away from the computer. Definitely promotes some creativity. But I just took it as an opportunity to walk on the beach.

Land:

Land

My favourite of my maps.

Land use vineyard across Europe from CORINE 2020, with the major regions labelled.

GHSL:

GHSL

Seasonal population of the Balearic Islands.

Data clipping in QGIS/GDAL, rendered in Aerialod, with labels with GIMP afterwards.

This was my second favourite of my maps. I think the topic is interesting and the execution is pretty good. Was however quite manual and probably needed more exaggeration to see the differences.

Historical:

Historical

A time lapse of 1,831,044 buildings in Ireland being added to OpenStreetMap.

If you want to get involved see: OpenStreetMap Ireland Buildings

Globe:

Globe

Simple spinning globe in QGIS, but I was happy that I was able to automate the export: Gist

All maps:

See here

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30 Day Map Challenge All Featured Ireland Maps

30 Day Map Challenge 2019

Last November I took part in the 30 Day Map Challenge. An excellent project suggested by Topi Tjukanov on twitter:

I perhaps had a bit of an advantage. I had already completed a very similar challenge in 2014. Mapvember.

Where I made a post on this blog every day for all of November, primarily maps.

Where I made a post on this blog every day for all of November, primarily maps.

And a summary:
https://gisforthought.com/mapvember/

There are a lot of advantages to this style of map creation and a few down sides.

Advantages

  • It puts a time limit on the maps. This forces you to put them out there no matter the status. It is easy to leave maps half finished because they are not perfect. I know the internet can be a harsh critic sometimes, but you are making a map a day, it won’t be perfect.
  • You can revisit some older maps that have been discarded in the past. Perhaps they didn’t look so good, weren’t so interesting. That doesn’t matter, you are posting a map a day they don’t have to be perfect.
  • There are a lot of ideas out there. I use a Google keep note to store map ideas I have. The list keeps on getting longer and without some pushing it never gets shorter.
  • Collaboration. There were some great maps made, and every day you could enjoy them as well, feeling part of the community. Sharing ideas and techniques.
  • Increase your talents. The only way you are going to get better at mapping is by making some maps. No better way to do it than pushing yourself.
  • Work with new data. 30 maps is a lot of maps. You can explore new datasets and new software.
  • Grow your following. As the challenge is on Twitter it is a good way to build your following. I got 139 new followers over the month. Now for some people that isn’t much. But I only have 600 in general so it’s a sizeable amount. Although I’m not sure there is that much value to followers. But 197k impressions is good? 1 follower per 1000 who saw a map.

Disadvantages

30 maps is a lot of maps to make. A day is a short time to make one. My tactic, based on my previous experience, was to make a few upfront and ready to go. So by the time November started I had a few maps ready, so I could be ahead of the curve.

I used tweetdeck to schedule the tweets. I didn’t map on the weekend for the most part. I had other commitments, so scheduling and making some easy maps was crucial to completing the challenge.

There are no real rules to the challenge, interpret it how you wish. Do a map a day, or a map a week, but the important part is enjoying it.

Maps

There is a great website that collects all the maps created by theme and creator:

https://david.frigge.nz/30DayMapChallenge/index.html

I have posted all of my maps here.

With a select few favorites:

Day 1Points – Ireland’s population mapped as one point per person. 6,572,675 points in total:

Day 2Lines – 1 week of flying for Ryanair EI-DYP Boeing 737-800:

Day 5Raster – Total rainfall in Ireland in 2018 from Met Eireann data:

Day 10Black and White – Register of renewed liquor licences: Publican’s Houses Dublin:

Day 19Urban – Perhaps Dublin’s most confused street:

All in all I whole heartedly recommend taking part when November rolls around again.